Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography AMU

Personal webpage for Dr Oliver Ross

Contact Information:

Oliver Ross, PhD (Senior Researcher)
Dept of Physical & Coastal Oceanography (OPLC)
Aix-Marseille University
Marseille, FRANCE
email: please add "oliver.ross" to @univ-amu.fr
Oliver Ross
www: MIO staff page · Google Scholar · Research Gate · LinkedIn
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SeaQUEST



"Meso- and Sub-mesoscale Physico-biogeochemical Dynamics in a Coastal NW Mediterranean Sea: Quantifying and Understanding Ecosystem Structure and Transport"

Project Quick Facts

  • P.I.: Oliver Ross
  • Host: Aix-Marseille University, Dr Christel Pinazo
  • Project number: 624170
  • Funding scheme: Marie Curie Actions - Intra European Fellowships (IEF)
  • Call: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IEF
  • Quantity of funding: 270 k€
  • Proposed start date: 01/04/2015
NEW: Link to the SeaQUEST cruise page, for the campaign starting 6 April 2016.

The overall objective of SeaQUEST is to examine the role of the Northern Current as a physical barrier to cross-shelf transport and the effect of its seasonal variability on the local biogeochemistry and plankton dynamics at meso- and sub-mesoscales.

Brief Scientific Rationale and socio-economic relevance

Shelf and coastal regions are at the interface between continents (impacted by human activities) and the open ocean (the main regulator of our planet’s climate and its biogeochemical cycles). The shelf-sea carbon pump largely relies on lateral transport to remove atmospheric CO2 from the ventilated surface waters and sequester it at depth. A good understanding of the physical transport processes in coastal regions and their impact on the ecosystem dynamics is therefore not only important for future climate predictions but also has a more immediate relevance (e.g., knowledge of local transport is necessary for the creation of marine protected areas, the management of spills, or the mitigation of harmful blooms events, etc.).

Schematic of the Gulf of LionSchematic of the Gulf of Lion

Figure 1: Map of the study area showing the main oceanographic features as well as dominant winds (T=Tramontane, M=Mistral, SE=Southeaster) and the upwelling zones (CB=Côte Bleu and C=Calanques).

SeaQUEST will study the horizontal transport and cross-shelf exchange processes including their effect on the biogeochemistry in the coastal zone around the Gulf of Lion (GoL) off the French Mediterranean coast, a highly productive area and important feeding ground for fish, birds, and mammals, both resident and migratory.

The main goal of SeaQUEST is to examine the role of the Northern Current as a physical barrier to cross-shelf transport and the effect of its seasonal variability on the local biogeochemistry and plankton dynamics at meso- and sub-mesoscales. This will be achieved through a highly interdisciplinary approach employing a range of methods and data (numerical simulations, in situ and satellite observations). SeaQUEST will provide new insights into the ecosystem functioning and biological-physical interactions in a highly productive and economically important coastal area which is also one of the main tourist destinations worldwide. The results will therefore be of broad relevance to a variety of stakeholders including decision makers and local managers.

Figure2

Figure 2: Satellite (MERIS) image of chlorophyll-a concentration. The dashed area shows the location of the NC. The sharp drop in Chl concentration near the shelf edge (arrows) indicates how the horizontal dispersal of Chl beyond the shelf edge is blocked by the NC.



(click to feed the fish)